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E-Marketing Performance Blog

Re-Evaluate Past PPC Success For Future Success

In the never ending effort to improve the success of the current campaigns, I recently spent some time going back through our AdWords history to see which ad creatives had been successful, as well as to see what keywords had converted strongly. I went back a year, prior to my employment with Pole Position Marketing. Sometimes I feel like my creativity has been tapped out, so I was hoping for some inspiration.

Looking at the campaign level, I found some paused and deleted campaigns with healthy Conversion Rates, leading me to wonder why that campaign had ever been paused, much less deleted. A quick glancing at the CTR and my questions were answered. Sometimes it is best to just dump what isn’t working and begin again. Ad group quality score certainly reflect that.

Digging in deeper to the ad group level of the higher converting campaigns, I found a few strong ad groups, and more that were not so strong. So I dug down into the higher converting ad groups to look at ad text and keywords. With the ad creative, I was interested most in which landing page had been used, as we’ve all learned that conversions are highest on the most relevant pages.

Where I found a universally dismal CTR, I also found the conversion rates to be pretty healthy for some of the keywords. Examining the ad creatives, again I found an overall dismal CTR rate, but some of the ads had very strong conversion rates.

Using this knowledge, I went into our current campaigns and made some pretty dramatic changes. The ad creative that I’ve been using has produced a solid CTR, so I combined what was working from my campaign efforts, with what had worked in previous efforts (landing pages) and the results are that my CTR rates are still improving, and the conversion rates are rising as well.

Win Win.

Max Speed

If the Pole Position Marketing team had a muse—and it does—it would be Max Speed. We love Max’s occasionally off-color, usually amusing and always pointed “Maxisms.” (Maybe “Maxims” would be a better word.) Max gives voice to some of the things we think but, bound by professional decorum, aren’t permitted to say. At least, not out loud.

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