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Webmaster World’s PubCon WrapUps

Over the next few days the Pole Position Marketing team will be posting their session notes from PubCon. Since I was invited to PubCon via our good friends at Search Engine Guide, I have posted my PubCon notes on the blog over there. That link will take you to my thoughts on the conference as a whole which links to notes on the sessions I attended.

I did have one interesting experience which isn’t noted on my official wrap up post. I attended the session about duplicate content primarily because I wanted a single question answered. During the Q&A time I made my way down the middle and tapped the microphone holder on the shoulder so I could ask it. Here was the gist of my question:

If an article gets duplicated across several sites and on each of those sites the article gets its own share of incoming links, do the outgoing links on that article still pass value, despite the article being duplicated?

The answer was a big, resounding silence from the panel, which included people from both Google and Yahoo. I’m not sure who finally took up the mantel on this (I think it was Tim Converse from Yahoo, but I could be wrong) the best he could do is, “I don’t think you should be focuses on that here.”

Hmmm… did I get a little too close to the secret sauce, or were these guys really stumped?

Stoney G deGeyter

Stoney deGeyter is the author of The Best Damn Web Marketing Checklist, Period!. He is the founder and CEO of Pole Position Marketing, a web presence optimization firm whose pit crew has been velocitizing websites since 1998. In his free time Stoney gets involved in community services and ministries with his “bride enjoy” and his children. Read Stoney’s full bio.

2 Responses to Webmaster World’s PubCon WrapUps

  1. Stoney …

    “If an article gets duplicated across several sites and on each of those sites the article gets its own share of incoming links, do the outgoing links on that article still pass value, despite the article being duplicated?”

    This is very interesting. I think the answer is … “yes” It makes sense because no matter where people find the article … if they do a link to it it’s most likely “unique” … I mean why would they go find other 20 copies and point 20 times? They’ll just link to one. It makes sense for your question to have a “YES” answer. Good thinking.

    A way to spam this system is to get one source linking to 20 copies and thus adding value to all copies. But then again …Google is not stupid. I am sure they have this under control. They will look at how many outgoing links there are and they’ll scan the content of the page where the link points out.

    Stoney … if you ever get some sort of an answer from someone else … I’ll be eager to know someone else’s take on this.

  2. Pingback: PubCon ‘06: Duplicate Content Issues » (EMP) E-Marketing Performance